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Hydration for High-Intensity Exercise in the Heat

Posted by Ashley Kelly on

Hydration for High-Intensity Exercise in the Heat  from WODSuperStore.com

As the temperature rises this summer, being properly hydrated for your workouts is essential for safety and performance. The reality is that MOST people are chronically dehydrated and this can lead to a number of issues. However it is important to be aware that there are dangers associated with over-hydration as well. Regardless of whether you’re guzzling a gallon of water or barely drinking 12oz of water throughout the day, read up, because there is information here for you.

Dehydration 
Dehydration is defined as an excessive loss of body-water with an associated disruption of metabolic processes. Severe levels of dehydration can be life-threatening resulting in heat-stroke and possibly even death. While most of us will never reach these levels of dehydration, most of us will experience the performance decreases associated with minor levels of dehydration. Research has shown that even as little as a 2% loss of water can result in a 4% decrease in strength or aerobic performance performance. That means if your 1RM back squat at optimal hydration levels is 300#, then at 2% dehydration your 1RM would be 285# (yes I rounded, but either way it sucks!). Minor levels of dehydration also result in muscle-tissue stiffness leading to a decrease in mobility and an increased risk of muscle-strain injury.


Dehydration issues

  1. Increased risk of heat-stroke
  2. Decreased strength and endurance performance
  3. Increased muscle-tissue stiffness
  4. Decreased mobility
  5. Increased risk of strain injuries
Hyper-hydration (hyponatremia)
Hyponatremia is defined as an electrolyte disturbance where the sodium concentration in the blood is lower than normal. Hyponatremia can result in a range of metabolic and nervous system issues that often resemble dehydration.  Hyponatremia can occur during exercise when athletes are losing excessive amounts of salt and other electrolytes through sweat coupled with drinking excessive quantities of water. This is commonly seen in inexperienced endurance runners who are drink only water at aid stations essentially diluting their blood sodium concentration to below physiological levels.  Hyponatremia is easy to prevent by consuming an electrolyte solution occasionally during exercise.

Practical Applications
As an athlete I am constantly aware of the impact my hydration status can have on performance.  I can usually tell that I am dehydrated pretty early in my warm-up, I notice that I’m not sweating very easily and its taking me longer to get loosened up. At this point it is probably too late to get re-hydrated for that training session but my immediate response is to drink an electrolyte solution in an effort to prevent further dehydration.  The reality is that an ounce of prevention is worth 24oz of cure. In other words - deal with your hydration needs before your workout, because once you start its difficult to correct dehydration.
Dehydration - WOD SuperStore
Hydration Tips
  1. Drink at least ½ your body-weight in ounces daily (this is #1 most important!) Keeping a water bottle with you throughout the day is a good way to achieve that many ounces.
  2. Utilize electrolyte solutions like NutriForce Balanced Hydration mixed with 12-24oz of water 30-60min before your workout to help prevent both dehydration and hyponatremia
  3. Creatine monohydrate MAY increase total-body water and prevent dehydration during exercise in the heat, however this is highly individual
  4. Research shows people drink more cold water during exercise versus room temperature, bring ice water to your workout to keep it cold
  5. If you are exercising for extended periods of time (90min+) consider adding an electrolyte solution to your water during exercise
  6. The more you sweat, the more water you need to drink.  In order to quantify how much water you need to replace, weigh yourself before and after your workout and drink 16oz of water for each pound lost during exercise
  7. Avoid alcohol immediately post-workout as alcohol will contribute to dehydration, deal with your hydration needs first, then enjoy the post-WOD festivities
  8. Caffeine in your pre-workout drink is a diuretic, if you’re consuming a caffeine infused pre-workout make sure you’re increasing your water consumption

Kyle Ruth M.S., CSCS, CFL-1, USAW-L1
WOD SuperStore Athlete
President: Accelerate Athletics Inc.
Owner: Crossfit LKN

    Read more

    Hydration for High-Intensity Exercise in the Heat

    Posted by Ashley Kelly on

    Hydration for High-Intensity Exercise in the Heat  from WODSuperStore.com

    As the temperature rises this summer, being properly hydrated for your workouts is essential for safety and performance. The reality is that MOST people are chronically dehydrated and this can lead to a number of issues. However it is important to be aware that there are dangers associated with over-hydration as well. Regardless of whether you’re guzzling a gallon of water or barely drinking 12oz of water throughout the day, read up, because there is information here for you.

    Dehydration 
    Dehydration is defined as an excessive loss of body-water with an associated disruption of metabolic processes. Severe levels of dehydration can be life-threatening resulting in heat-stroke and possibly even death. While most of us will never reach these levels of dehydration, most of us will experience the performance decreases associated with minor levels of dehydration. Research has shown that even as little as a 2% loss of water can result in a 4% decrease in strength or aerobic performance performance. That means if your 1RM back squat at optimal hydration levels is 300#, then at 2% dehydration your 1RM would be 285# (yes I rounded, but either way it sucks!). Minor levels of dehydration also result in muscle-tissue stiffness leading to a decrease in mobility and an increased risk of muscle-strain injury.


    Dehydration issues

    1. Increased risk of heat-stroke
    2. Decreased strength and endurance performance
    3. Increased muscle-tissue stiffness
    4. Decreased mobility
    5. Increased risk of strain injuries
    Hyper-hydration (hyponatremia)
    Hyponatremia is defined as an electrolyte disturbance where the sodium concentration in the blood is lower than normal. Hyponatremia can result in a range of metabolic and nervous system issues that often resemble dehydration.  Hyponatremia can occur during exercise when athletes are losing excessive amounts of salt and other electrolytes through sweat coupled with drinking excessive quantities of water. This is commonly seen in inexperienced endurance runners who are drink only water at aid stations essentially diluting their blood sodium concentration to below physiological levels.  Hyponatremia is easy to prevent by consuming an electrolyte solution occasionally during exercise.

    Practical Applications
    As an athlete I am constantly aware of the impact my hydration status can have on performance.  I can usually tell that I am dehydrated pretty early in my warm-up, I notice that I’m not sweating very easily and its taking me longer to get loosened up. At this point it is probably too late to get re-hydrated for that training session but my immediate response is to drink an electrolyte solution in an effort to prevent further dehydration.  The reality is that an ounce of prevention is worth 24oz of cure. In other words - deal with your hydration needs before your workout, because once you start its difficult to correct dehydration.
    Dehydration - WOD SuperStore
    Hydration Tips
    1. Drink at least ½ your body-weight in ounces daily (this is #1 most important!) Keeping a water bottle with you throughout the day is a good way to achieve that many ounces.
    2. Utilize electrolyte solutions like NutriForce Balanced Hydration mixed with 12-24oz of water 30-60min before your workout to help prevent both dehydration and hyponatremia
    3. Creatine monohydrate MAY increase total-body water and prevent dehydration during exercise in the heat, however this is highly individual
    4. Research shows people drink more cold water during exercise versus room temperature, bring ice water to your workout to keep it cold
    5. If you are exercising for extended periods of time (90min+) consider adding an electrolyte solution to your water during exercise
    6. The more you sweat, the more water you need to drink.  In order to quantify how much water you need to replace, weigh yourself before and after your workout and drink 16oz of water for each pound lost during exercise
    7. Avoid alcohol immediately post-workout as alcohol will contribute to dehydration, deal with your hydration needs first, then enjoy the post-WOD festivities
    8. Caffeine in your pre-workout drink is a diuretic, if you’re consuming a caffeine infused pre-workout make sure you’re increasing your water consumption

    Kyle Ruth M.S., CSCS, CFL-1, USAW-L1
    WOD SuperStore Athlete
    President: Accelerate Athletics Inc.
    Owner: Crossfit LKN

      Read more


      5 Tips to Help You Prepare for the Open

      Posted by Kyle Ruth on

      5 Tips to help you prepare for the Open - Kyle Ruth
      1. Plan to Repeat the Workouts
        In my experience, most people’s first attempt at a test like an Open workout is fraught with mistakes. For the most part, we go into them not really knowing what to expect and end up with terrible pacing strategies. Repeating the workouts gives us a chance to learn from our mistakes and improve our pacing strategy. I’ve found that athletes can commonly improve by 3-5% on their second attempt just by knowing what to expect and how to pace correctly for the workout. You might be thinking 5% isn’t a very big margin of improvement but on workout 12.1 if you scored 120 in the 7 minutes of burpees then repeated the workout and scored 126 (5% improvement) you would have moved from 1995th place in the world to 793rd place in the world.
      2. Film your Workouts
        Even though there are new rules this year requiring anyone who plans to qualify for Regionals to film their workouts...I believe EVERYONE should film their workout. Reviewing video footage of yourself dramatically improves learning and will let you objectively determine your weak points (and eliminate them if you repeat the workout like I suggest in #1). Motor learning research consistently shows that people who watch themselves perform a movement make faster progress than those who don't. Use tools like your smartphone to get ahead of the curve. Check out the Perchmount Fit - it's the perfect tool to help you film your WOD!
      3. Stop Leaderboarding
        Everyone has different goals coming into the Open, some people are sign-up to enjoy the experience and camaraderie, others are trying to qualify for Regionals. If your goal is to maximize your placing, then you need to spend more time focusing on your performance and not getting caught up in the fanfare. Spending hours browsing through the leader board isn’t going to make you any closer to qualifying! Nothing is more distracting than watching your name drop down the leader board each hour, it can become addictive. I KNOW as well as anyone. Spend time finding YOUR weak links (by following my advice in #1 and #2!) and then attack them!
      4. Take Care of your Hands
        Rips take FOREVER to heal completely (mine from WODapalooza 4 weeks ago are FINALLY healed!). The best strategy is to prevent them in the first place (an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure right?). My suggestion is to get a pair of gloves or gymnastics grips, and practice with them in the weeks and days leading into the Open. There is no reason to try to show how “tough” you are during the Open...let your performance do the talking without the headache of ripped hands. Basic callous maintenance goes a really long way when you're potentially doing 10 tests over 5 weeks. 
        Check out our Hand Rips collection to get everything you need to protect, manage and repair! 
      5. Be Confident in your Preparation...by Being Prepared
        There will be muscle-ups, there will be double-unders, the pull-ups will be chest-to-bar...you need to be prepared for these movements because they WILL show up. If you haven’t mastered these movements you need start spending time on them right now! For skill based movements like double-unders this might mean simply practicing before and after your workouts. Movements like chest-to-bar pull-ups and muscle-ups have both skill and strength components, your program needs to be developing both.
      Aside from that...good luck and leave everything out there. 

      Kyle Ruth, M.S., CSCS, CFL-1, USAW
      WOD SuperStore Athlete
      Owner: CrossFit LKN

      Read more

      5 Tips to Help You Prepare for the Open

      Posted by Kyle Ruth on

      5 Tips to help you prepare for the Open - Kyle Ruth
      1. Plan to Repeat the Workouts
        In my experience, most people’s first attempt at a test like an Open workout is fraught with mistakes. For the most part, we go into them not really knowing what to expect and end up with terrible pacing strategies. Repeating the workouts gives us a chance to learn from our mistakes and improve our pacing strategy. I’ve found that athletes can commonly improve by 3-5% on their second attempt just by knowing what to expect and how to pace correctly for the workout. You might be thinking 5% isn’t a very big margin of improvement but on workout 12.1 if you scored 120 in the 7 minutes of burpees then repeated the workout and scored 126 (5% improvement) you would have moved from 1995th place in the world to 793rd place in the world.
      2. Film your Workouts
        Even though there are new rules this year requiring anyone who plans to qualify for Regionals to film their workouts...I believe EVERYONE should film their workout. Reviewing video footage of yourself dramatically improves learning and will let you objectively determine your weak points (and eliminate them if you repeat the workout like I suggest in #1). Motor learning research consistently shows that people who watch themselves perform a movement make faster progress than those who don't. Use tools like your smartphone to get ahead of the curve. Check out the Perchmount Fit - it's the perfect tool to help you film your WOD!
      3. Stop Leaderboarding
        Everyone has different goals coming into the Open, some people are sign-up to enjoy the experience and camaraderie, others are trying to qualify for Regionals. If your goal is to maximize your placing, then you need to spend more time focusing on your performance and not getting caught up in the fanfare. Spending hours browsing through the leader board isn’t going to make you any closer to qualifying! Nothing is more distracting than watching your name drop down the leader board each hour, it can become addictive. I KNOW as well as anyone. Spend time finding YOUR weak links (by following my advice in #1 and #2!) and then attack them!
      4. Take Care of your Hands
        Rips take FOREVER to heal completely (mine from WODapalooza 4 weeks ago are FINALLY healed!). The best strategy is to prevent them in the first place (an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure right?). My suggestion is to get a pair of gloves or gymnastics grips, and practice with them in the weeks and days leading into the Open. There is no reason to try to show how “tough” you are during the Open...let your performance do the talking without the headache of ripped hands. Basic callous maintenance goes a really long way when you're potentially doing 10 tests over 5 weeks. 
        Check out our Hand Rips collection to get everything you need to protect, manage and repair! 
      5. Be Confident in your Preparation...by Being Prepared
        There will be muscle-ups, there will be double-unders, the pull-ups will be chest-to-bar...you need to be prepared for these movements because they WILL show up. If you haven’t mastered these movements you need start spending time on them right now! For skill based movements like double-unders this might mean simply practicing before and after your workouts. Movements like chest-to-bar pull-ups and muscle-ups have both skill and strength components, your program needs to be developing both.
      Aside from that...good luck and leave everything out there. 

      Kyle Ruth, M.S., CSCS, CFL-1, USAW
      WOD SuperStore Athlete
      Owner: CrossFit LKN

      Read more


      How do you keep track of your AMRAP rounds or reps when doing those spicy CrossFit WOD’s?

      Posted by Mark Chandley on

       

      Since I started doing CrossFit I have always been challenged by keeping track of those AMRAPS or worse yet, a WOD like the dreaded Barbara; killing myself for 5 minutes, then a 3 minute rest.  When did I start?  Wait, when did I finish?  Oh man, I don’t want to cheat myself here!

      At least with something like Fight Gone Bad the whole group is on the clock so the coaches are clear about when it’s time to change and when your rest is over. 

      Here are a few methods I have discussed or observed in our box over the years:

      • Steal Trap – Some CrossFitters can just remember their rounds (or at least they say they can).  I can’t comprehend this method as when I am gasping for air my brain shuts down.  Well, actually it starts the good cop, bad cop routine.  You know what I am saying . . . “stop, you can’t breathe and this sucks” followed by “come on, just keep moving, they always say you will pass out before you would die.”  The last thing I can think about is what round I am on or how many reps I am on after the 3rd round.
      • Buddy System – With this approach, you need to find someone that is slightly higher in fitness level to you AND is employing some system other than the buddy system (THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT!).   Now this isn't a fair proof system but for an AMRAP with rounds, this can be very effective and quite mindless.  Just keep yourself aware of how far behind you are of your “pace car” and when you complete the WOD, just walk over and ask them how many rounds they did.  You then add or subtract where you thought you were against them.  Not the most scientific but it can work.
      • Chalk – This is my preferred method but the down side is obvious, you need to stop and keep track of your reps or rounds.  A trick to cut down some time out of the WOD would be to keep track of every two rounds at a time.  I sometimes find myself prolonging the time it takes to mark two hashes on the floor. 
      • “Guestimate” – Believe it or not, I have seen this done.  It’s the least effective method but for those who are there purely for the workout and not the competitive nature of CrossFit, it can work.  I don’t recommend it but needed to include it.  It’s actually anti CrossFit if you ask me.

      Outside of competitions where the judge counts your reps (and will NO REP you from time to time) I don’t know that any of these are fool proof.  Oh, and one last tip, never be fooled by the whiteboard.  If the workout looks short, NEVER assume those are easier as the WOD always wins!

      Read more

       

      Since I started doing CrossFit I have always been challenged by keeping track of those AMRAPS or worse yet, a WOD like the dreaded Barbara; killing myself for 5 minutes, then a 3 minute rest.  When did I start?  Wait, when did I finish?  Oh man, I don’t want to cheat myself here!

      At least with something like Fight Gone Bad the whole group is on the clock so the coaches are clear about when it’s time to change and when your rest is over. 

      Here are a few methods I have discussed or observed in our box over the years:

      • Steal Trap – Some CrossFitters can just remember their rounds (or at least they say they can).  I can’t comprehend this method as when I am gasping for air my brain shuts down.  Well, actually it starts the good cop, bad cop routine.  You know what I am saying . . . “stop, you can’t breathe and this sucks” followed by “come on, just keep moving, they always say you will pass out before you would die.”  The last thing I can think about is what round I am on or how many reps I am on after the 3rd round.
      • Buddy System – With this approach, you need to find someone that is slightly higher in fitness level to you AND is employing some system other than the buddy system (THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT!).   Now this isn't a fair proof system but for an AMRAP with rounds, this can be very effective and quite mindless.  Just keep yourself aware of how far behind you are of your “pace car” and when you complete the WOD, just walk over and ask them how many rounds they did.  You then add or subtract where you thought you were against them.  Not the most scientific but it can work.
      • Chalk – This is my preferred method but the down side is obvious, you need to stop and keep track of your reps or rounds.  A trick to cut down some time out of the WOD would be to keep track of every two rounds at a time.  I sometimes find myself prolonging the time it takes to mark two hashes on the floor. 
      • “Guestimate” – Believe it or not, I have seen this done.  It’s the least effective method but for those who are there purely for the workout and not the competitive nature of CrossFit, it can work.  I don’t recommend it but needed to include it.  It’s actually anti CrossFit if you ask me.

      Outside of competitions where the judge counts your reps (and will NO REP you from time to time) I don’t know that any of these are fool proof.  Oh, and one last tip, never be fooled by the whiteboard.  If the workout looks short, NEVER assume those are easier as the WOD always wins!

      Read more


      Crossfit Affiliate Focuses on Fundamentals

      Posted by Mike Murphy on

      I was having lunch this weekend with someone who works out at a local Crossfit Affiliate in Charlotte and they mentioned that the local Fox News affiliate would be finishing a story about reported injuries that Crossfit members are experiencing in our area. I know this should seem like common sense stuff, but I don’t want to see Crossfit get any negative publicity when people can routinely get injured from all types of training. It’s important to start slow and pay attention to your time, focusing on form and proper technique before you start adding weight. Programs like Crossfit, Insanity and P90x should be a gradual process. If you ask any triathlete how they’re feeling by the end of the year, many of them are burnt out and nursing nagging injuries or some other form of discomfort. 




      Have you experienced any injuries from improper technique or starting out too fast? What WOD makes you the most sore afterwards? Leave a comment below and share your story.

      Read more

      Crossfit Affiliate Focuses on Fundamentals

      Posted by Mike Murphy on

      I was having lunch this weekend with someone who works out at a local Crossfit Affiliate in Charlotte and they mentioned that the local Fox News affiliate would be finishing a story about reported injuries that Crossfit members are experiencing in our area. I know this should seem like common sense stuff, but I don’t want to see Crossfit get any negative publicity when people can routinely get injured from all types of training. It’s important to start slow and pay attention to your time, focusing on form and proper technique before you start adding weight. Programs like Crossfit, Insanity and P90x should be a gradual process. If you ask any triathlete how they’re feeling by the end of the year, many of them are burnt out and nursing nagging injuries or some other form of discomfort. 




      Have you experienced any injuries from improper technique or starting out too fast? What WOD makes you the most sore afterwards? Leave a comment below and share your story.

      Read more


      My Crossfit Foundations Experience

      Posted by Mike Murphy on

      muscle upI’ve done Crossfit movements for years but never took an official foundations class or signed up to join a local box. A great deal was offered to me as a member of a local fitness club so I decided to jump on it and join the Lake Norman Crossfit Foundations class. 

      In the first few classes we covered some basic dynamic stretches and movements. Things like the Samson stretch, spider man stretch, PVC pass-throughs, air squats and how to do a strict press versus a push press. It had been years since I had any formal instruction on some of these movements. I was thinking back to my days of playing high school football and honestly couldn’t even remember what had been taught to me. Over time I’m sure I developed bad habits and got stuck in the rut of only doing things like a push press and not strict press since it requires more focus. For strict press it’s important to tuck your chin into your neck and then at the end of the rep “poke your head out the window.” We also covered the correct form for a kettlebell swing, which I learned I wasn’t opening my hips enough at the end of the movement. I could immediately feel a difference and found I had to battle myself from slipping back into bad habits. 

      After that it was time for the Workout of the Day (WOD). The first WOD was what is called an AMRAP. That stands for “as many repetitions/reps as possible”. Our AMRAP workout consisted of five barbell push press and 15 kettlebell swings. We did this for 10 minutes, which doesn’t seem like a daunting task at first but definitely left my shoulders and lower back burning. I opted to go for a slightly heavier kettlebell before the WOD started. I was regretting this decision a few minutes into the WOD. Someone else in the class (Billy) gave me some friendly heckling about picking the heavier weight.

      In the third Crossfit foundations class we covered walking lunges and “over unders” which is where you shuffle sideways as if you are stepping over a hurdle and then ducking under one. Then we did more air squats, brushed up on our barbell push press and barbell front squats. The workout consisted of another AMRAP where we would run 400 meters and then do 15 kettlebell squats. I had foolishly run 8 miles that morning prior to class. I had all I could do to keep from cramping. I made sure to check the foundations blog after that to get an idea of what each class would have in store. That way I could give certain muscle groups a break and not overwork myself in any one area.

      In the fourth class we started with a review of hip stretching, spider stretch, v leg sit-ups, reverse plank and again covered push press. It’s important to bend the knees slightly and take advantage of the downward momentum to push the bar back up when doing the push press. We covered the box jump, the kipping pull-up, band assisted pull up and butterfly pull up. I had to focus the most on opening my hips and fully standing up at the top of the box jump. I had done all of these exercises before but I was really here to work on my form so I paid extra attention to each repetition.

      At the end of the fourth class our WOD was a 12 minute AMRAP of 5 push press, 5 box jump and 5 pull-up. I was shooting for at least 12 rounds, hoping to beat 14 and got 15 rounds completed when it was all said and done. Aside from working several muscle groups my heart rate was up the entire time and left me feeling like I burned a decent amount of calories. I always feel a level of satisfaction with the workout if I get a good sweat.

      Afterwards I jumped on the rings to do a muscle up and was able to get one rep before I lost my form. I routinely do muscle ups on regular pull up bars but rarely get to do them on rings. I guess the class watching made me nervous because I couldn’t mimic my typical form. Stage fright apparently got the best of me this particular day.
      muscle up

      I’ll be writing more about my experience finishing the foundation class and working on my form with these movements over time.

      Read more

      My Crossfit Foundations Experience

      Posted by Mike Murphy on

      muscle upI’ve done Crossfit movements for years but never took an official foundations class or signed up to join a local box. A great deal was offered to me as a member of a local fitness club so I decided to jump on it and join the Lake Norman Crossfit Foundations class. 

      In the first few classes we covered some basic dynamic stretches and movements. Things like the Samson stretch, spider man stretch, PVC pass-throughs, air squats and how to do a strict press versus a push press. It had been years since I had any formal instruction on some of these movements. I was thinking back to my days of playing high school football and honestly couldn’t even remember what had been taught to me. Over time I’m sure I developed bad habits and got stuck in the rut of only doing things like a push press and not strict press since it requires more focus. For strict press it’s important to tuck your chin into your neck and then at the end of the rep “poke your head out the window.” We also covered the correct form for a kettlebell swing, which I learned I wasn’t opening my hips enough at the end of the movement. I could immediately feel a difference and found I had to battle myself from slipping back into bad habits. 

      After that it was time for the Workout of the Day (WOD). The first WOD was what is called an AMRAP. That stands for “as many repetitions/reps as possible”. Our AMRAP workout consisted of five barbell push press and 15 kettlebell swings. We did this for 10 minutes, which doesn’t seem like a daunting task at first but definitely left my shoulders and lower back burning. I opted to go for a slightly heavier kettlebell before the WOD started. I was regretting this decision a few minutes into the WOD. Someone else in the class (Billy) gave me some friendly heckling about picking the heavier weight.

      In the third Crossfit foundations class we covered walking lunges and “over unders” which is where you shuffle sideways as if you are stepping over a hurdle and then ducking under one. Then we did more air squats, brushed up on our barbell push press and barbell front squats. The workout consisted of another AMRAP where we would run 400 meters and then do 15 kettlebell squats. I had foolishly run 8 miles that morning prior to class. I had all I could do to keep from cramping. I made sure to check the foundations blog after that to get an idea of what each class would have in store. That way I could give certain muscle groups a break and not overwork myself in any one area.

      In the fourth class we started with a review of hip stretching, spider stretch, v leg sit-ups, reverse plank and again covered push press. It’s important to bend the knees slightly and take advantage of the downward momentum to push the bar back up when doing the push press. We covered the box jump, the kipping pull-up, band assisted pull up and butterfly pull up. I had to focus the most on opening my hips and fully standing up at the top of the box jump. I had done all of these exercises before but I was really here to work on my form so I paid extra attention to each repetition.

      At the end of the fourth class our WOD was a 12 minute AMRAP of 5 push press, 5 box jump and 5 pull-up. I was shooting for at least 12 rounds, hoping to beat 14 and got 15 rounds completed when it was all said and done. Aside from working several muscle groups my heart rate was up the entire time and left me feeling like I burned a decent amount of calories. I always feel a level of satisfaction with the workout if I get a good sweat.

      Afterwards I jumped on the rings to do a muscle up and was able to get one rep before I lost my form. I routinely do muscle ups on regular pull up bars but rarely get to do them on rings. I guess the class watching made me nervous because I couldn’t mimic my typical form. Stage fright apparently got the best of me this particular day.
      muscle up

      I’ll be writing more about my experience finishing the foundation class and working on my form with these movements over time.

      Read more