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Headed to CrossFit® Regionals? What to do and Where to WOD in each city!

Posted by Altria Support on

The official CrossFit® Regionals Schedule has been released. We've outlined ideas to add some FUN to your trip and where to get your WOD on!

Read more

The official CrossFit® Regionals Schedule has been released. We've outlined ideas to add some FUN to your trip and where to get your WOD on!

Read more


The Open Is For Us All

Posted by Emily Friedman on



One of the things about the Open that I love is it is truly for everyone. There is a reason to participate whether you’re a three time CrossFit Games athlete, have aspirations to one day compete at regionals on a team, have been doing CrossFit for a while but haven’t ever considered competing, or just started CrossFit 2 months ago and cant remember the difference between a thruster and a pushpress. CrossFit has strategically programmed the workouts to be performed by anyone, of any athletic ability, anywhere in the world. Here is a little insight into how different athletes might approach the Open and enjoy the completion season.

The Games Athlete
For the most elite athletes, the Open marks the beginning of the Games season. Workouts are taken seriously, but training for Regionals and the Games remains the focus. Weekly programming and training is not altered at all to accommodate Open workouts. Most top athletes consider the Open to be a stepping stone to Regional and will not repeat workouts because it is counterproductive to preparing for the next stage of the Games season. My weekly schedule during the Open looks as follows:

  • Day 1: Train
  • Day 2: Active Recovery
  • Day 3: Train
  • Day 4: Train
  • Day 5: Rest
  • Day 6: Open Workout & Train after
  • Day 7: Train

Between the Open announcement and the end of Day 5, I think about my strategy for the workout. I watch the live announcement and write down split times and rep schemes. I keep my eye on the top scores on the leader board both worldwide and also in my region so I know what will be competitive. I go to sleep on Day 5 knowing exactly what I will do the next day, and try my best to execute the game plan. Sometimes I also like to do the Open workouts with another competitive athlete so that I can practice being in that environment and get a little extra push. I will never repeat Open workouts unless my score is low enough to keep me out of the fast heat on day 1 at regionals. Open workouts will be repeated on Day 7 ONLY if I completely fall on my face, the clock stops, or the camera doesn’t record correctly. Athletes that neglect the rest of their training in order to repeat Open workouts and post the highest scores possible might struggle later in the competition season when the loads get heavier and the movements get more skilled.

The Regionals Hopeful
To the Regional hopeful, the Open is possibly the most important stage of the competition season. It is make or break. Before setting your weekly training schedule, ask yourself if qualifying for regionals is your end goal, or if you want to be able to do well at regionals if you qualify. The answer to that question will have an affect on your weekly training schedule. If you want to do well and be competitive at regionals, then your schedule should look almost identical to the Games Athlete. You might choose to shift your week up 1 day, with the expectation that some workouts will be repeated. Give yourself 1 day between doing the Open workouts instead of doing them back-to-back. However, if you’re more concerned about qualifying for regionals than how you perform at regionals, then you might want to set your training schedule up in a way that allows you to do the workouts twice. Most athletes in this position will likely choose to re-do at least one or two of the workouts. Scores will be posted as late as possible because it is increasingly difficult to qualify for regionals every year. The playing field is getting more and more competitive! Prepare for 6 weeks of being glued to the leader board, not sleeping much, and dreaming about rep schemes at night!

The Everyday CrossFitter
To the everyday CrossFitter who doesn’t take competition too seriously, the Open can still be an extremely exciting time of year. There might not be any hopes or aspirations of competing at the next level, but the Open can be used to test the work you have put in all year at the gym. It is very likely to see an Open workout from a previous year pop up again. Maybe this year you have developed new skills like double-unders or pistols or muscle ups that will allow you to add 30 more reps to your score from last year! Or, maybe your work capacity has increased so much that you double your score! Despite the numbers on the score sheet once the clock stops, it is an opportunity to “play” the sport of fitness. For all you former athletes who miss that competitive arena, here is your chance to dress up for game day again. Enjoy pre-game meal, the night before nerves in anticipation of your big day. And, for those of you who missed out on competitive sports earlier in life, here is your chance. There is an objective, a set of rules and standards, a clock, a judge, penalties, and a score at the end of it all.

The Rookie
Ok, so you just started CrossFit three weeks ago. You’re can’t quite remember the difference between a pushpress and a thruster, you don’t bound box jumps, and you’re working on pullups with a green band. You’re wondering what all the hype is about this thing called the “Open”?? Well lucky for you one of the most exciting times of the year is NOW. The Games have begun and you’re a part of it because many gyms include the Open workouts in their weekly programming over the next 6 weeks. You’re probably doing the Open whether you signed up or no so you might as well pay your $20, have your name on the gym team roster and be a part of the community. You’ll develop an appreciation for how much work and preparation goes into the competition for the top athletes at your gym. You’ll enjoy the excitement before the workouts and the celebrations after the workouts. You’ll truly understand the importance of movement standards and why keeping track of you progress by journaling is exciting. And, you’ll have a fantastic excuse to purchase a few equipment necessities like a custom jump rope, lifting shoes, gripswrist wraps and knee sleeves. If there’s one thing CrossFitters are good at, it diving in head first. Welcome to the team.

 

Read more

The Open Is For Us All

Posted by Emily Friedman on



One of the things about the Open that I love is it is truly for everyone. There is a reason to participate whether you’re a three time CrossFit Games athlete, have aspirations to one day compete at regionals on a team, have been doing CrossFit for a while but haven’t ever considered competing, or just started CrossFit 2 months ago and cant remember the difference between a thruster and a pushpress. CrossFit has strategically programmed the workouts to be performed by anyone, of any athletic ability, anywhere in the world. Here is a little insight into how different athletes might approach the Open and enjoy the completion season.

The Games Athlete
For the most elite athletes, the Open marks the beginning of the Games season. Workouts are taken seriously, but training for Regionals and the Games remains the focus. Weekly programming and training is not altered at all to accommodate Open workouts. Most top athletes consider the Open to be a stepping stone to Regional and will not repeat workouts because it is counterproductive to preparing for the next stage of the Games season. My weekly schedule during the Open looks as follows:

  • Day 1: Train
  • Day 2: Active Recovery
  • Day 3: Train
  • Day 4: Train
  • Day 5: Rest
  • Day 6: Open Workout & Train after
  • Day 7: Train

Between the Open announcement and the end of Day 5, I think about my strategy for the workout. I watch the live announcement and write down split times and rep schemes. I keep my eye on the top scores on the leader board both worldwide and also in my region so I know what will be competitive. I go to sleep on Day 5 knowing exactly what I will do the next day, and try my best to execute the game plan. Sometimes I also like to do the Open workouts with another competitive athlete so that I can practice being in that environment and get a little extra push. I will never repeat Open workouts unless my score is low enough to keep me out of the fast heat on day 1 at regionals. Open workouts will be repeated on Day 7 ONLY if I completely fall on my face, the clock stops, or the camera doesn’t record correctly. Athletes that neglect the rest of their training in order to repeat Open workouts and post the highest scores possible might struggle later in the competition season when the loads get heavier and the movements get more skilled.

The Regionals Hopeful
To the Regional hopeful, the Open is possibly the most important stage of the competition season. It is make or break. Before setting your weekly training schedule, ask yourself if qualifying for regionals is your end goal, or if you want to be able to do well at regionals if you qualify. The answer to that question will have an affect on your weekly training schedule. If you want to do well and be competitive at regionals, then your schedule should look almost identical to the Games Athlete. You might choose to shift your week up 1 day, with the expectation that some workouts will be repeated. Give yourself 1 day between doing the Open workouts instead of doing them back-to-back. However, if you’re more concerned about qualifying for regionals than how you perform at regionals, then you might want to set your training schedule up in a way that allows you to do the workouts twice. Most athletes in this position will likely choose to re-do at least one or two of the workouts. Scores will be posted as late as possible because it is increasingly difficult to qualify for regionals every year. The playing field is getting more and more competitive! Prepare for 6 weeks of being glued to the leader board, not sleeping much, and dreaming about rep schemes at night!

The Everyday CrossFitter
To the everyday CrossFitter who doesn’t take competition too seriously, the Open can still be an extremely exciting time of year. There might not be any hopes or aspirations of competing at the next level, but the Open can be used to test the work you have put in all year at the gym. It is very likely to see an Open workout from a previous year pop up again. Maybe this year you have developed new skills like double-unders or pistols or muscle ups that will allow you to add 30 more reps to your score from last year! Or, maybe your work capacity has increased so much that you double your score! Despite the numbers on the score sheet once the clock stops, it is an opportunity to “play” the sport of fitness. For all you former athletes who miss that competitive arena, here is your chance to dress up for game day again. Enjoy pre-game meal, the night before nerves in anticipation of your big day. And, for those of you who missed out on competitive sports earlier in life, here is your chance. There is an objective, a set of rules and standards, a clock, a judge, penalties, and a score at the end of it all.

The Rookie
Ok, so you just started CrossFit three weeks ago. You’re can’t quite remember the difference between a pushpress and a thruster, you don’t bound box jumps, and you’re working on pullups with a green band. You’re wondering what all the hype is about this thing called the “Open”?? Well lucky for you one of the most exciting times of the year is NOW. The Games have begun and you’re a part of it because many gyms include the Open workouts in their weekly programming over the next 6 weeks. You’re probably doing the Open whether you signed up or no so you might as well pay your $20, have your name on the gym team roster and be a part of the community. You’ll develop an appreciation for how much work and preparation goes into the competition for the top athletes at your gym. You’ll enjoy the excitement before the workouts and the celebrations after the workouts. You’ll truly understand the importance of movement standards and why keeping track of you progress by journaling is exciting. And, you’ll have a fantastic excuse to purchase a few equipment necessities like a custom jump rope, lifting shoes, gripswrist wraps and knee sleeves. If there’s one thing CrossFitters are good at, it diving in head first. Welcome to the team.

 

Read more


Top 10 Mistakes CrossFitters Make

Posted by Talayna Fortunato on

 

Top 10 Mistakes CrossFitters Make by WODSuperStore.com

Top 10 Mistakes CrossFitters Make

  1. Not Warming Up Properly

Everyday it takes me around 30 minutes to warm-up. I start with easy cardio for 5-10 min. then do some light foam rolling and stretching, leg swings, lunges, rotator cuff exercises, and finally movements specific to the workout I’m about to do. My warm-up has gotten more extensive (and longer) with each year I do CrossFit®. Almost to the point that it started to annoy me, and then I remembered back to my gymnastics days. Ever since I was on team at age 8, I remember our warm-ups taking us at least 30 minutes with all of the stretching and other calisthenics we did. Even though we were young and healthy I believe the gymnastics coaches knew what they were doing to keep us that way. With the intensity of competitive CrossFit® it’s imperative to put in the time for an adequate warm-up and mobility work. If you don’t put in the time now you’ll put it in later when you have an injury.

  1. Eating too Strict of a Paleo Diet

If you are a recreational CrossFitter following a Paleo lifestyle is probably nutritionally adequate and a good way of maintaining longevity and health. However, if you are a competitive level athlete and training intensely more than an hour a day your main source of energy is carbohydrates and strict paleo simply does not provide enough sources of them. Now I’m not saying to go out and carb load on pasta, bread, or sugar. That’s just an inflammatory insulin bomb. I am saying look for complex sources of carbohydrates from plants and low glycemic grains to add into your diet, especially when training is at its peak. During an interview at the Games every individual athlete was asked who follows a paleo diet, and not a single one raised their hand.

  1. Sacrificing Technique and Movement Efficiency for Intensity and Eventual Technical Breakdown.

CrossFit gets results due to the intensity of the workouts, but that doesn't mean throw all good form out the window. For example if your back starts rounding when you’re pulling from the ground or you’re chasing wildly after snatches, it’s time to put the bar down until you can regain efficiency. Your back and other body parts will thank you later! Also if you’re compromising range of motion enough to miss consecutive reps, take a quick rest before you go again. Otherwise you’re ingraining poor habits and when you reach that place of pain and fatigue again in competition guess what’ll happen… No Rep!

  1. Doing Volume for Volume’s Sake without Intent.

CrossFitters are notorious for thinking that when they’re getting ready to compete more is better. This mindset leads to the performance of multiple hero WoDs in a day with the intent of “loading”, when what it really does is break the athlete down with laborious repetition and impede lasting gains. More is not better, better is better. Having a purpose, i.e. knowing the energy system and muscular groups you’re trying to tax during a workout allows you to work smart and hard, not just hard. Again, your body will also thank you later!

  1. Cherry Picking Workouts and/or Jumping Around Programs

This is for the CrossFitter that walks into the gym and decides when they get there what workout they’re going to do based on what their gym posts and which one of the blogs they follow appears best that day. Blogs are written for a reason, with progressive intent to allow your workouts to build upon themselves for measurable improvements in your numbers. If you jump from program to program, weekly or even daily, that progress is completely short-circuited. Not to mention you’re probably doing mostly what you’re good at and not working your weaknesses enough.

  1. Following a Strength Progression that Doesn't Makes Sense or One Without Any Progression at All.

The body adapts to load by responding to meet the load in the form of muscular hypertrophy. There have been many studies showing the best percentages of max load, sets, reps, and frequency to produce optimal gains without under or overloading the athlete. These studies have produced named strength progression tables, squat cycles, and the like. You can reinvent the wheel and use yourself as a guinea pig to do your own research, or you can find a viable progression and just follow it. I’ll give you one guess what most long-term successful athletes do. One other thought to keep in mind is how much loading your conditioning work is providing.  An example would be making your conditioning heavy on the weights during the heaviest week of a strength loading cycle (no bueno).

  1. Forgetting to Supplement Your Program with Basics, Strict Strength, and Supplemental Work.

Just because you can kip almost any movement in CrossFit, doesn’t mean it’s in your best interest to do so all of the time. Working strict strength with things like dumbbell press or tempo bench press can do wonders for the strength of your jerk or stamina of kipping handstand push-ups. Sometimes to get better at a complex movement you need better strength with the basics as well. Think along the lines how important the hollow position is during kipping in general and you’ll see why doing hollow rocks would have carry over into almost all gymnastics movements. Basic skills and strict strength also overlap with supplemental work, which can be a great way to address muscular imbalances and push past plateaus. Supplemental work is also a staple in the work of some of the strongest people on the planet who employ Loui Simmon’s conjugate method.

  1. Waiting >90min. to Replenish After a Hard Training Session or Only Replenishing Protein.

The fact is the majority of CrossFitters do not need a liquid protein shake post-workout. If you are just doing CrossFit as part of a healthy lifestyle or you are trying to decrease body fat, then a meal consisting of lean protein, nutrient-dense carbs (vegetables) and healthy fat is best post-workout. However, if you are participating in CrossFit as a competitive athlete and are completing multiple grueling and taxing workouts several days per week (and many times twice per day), your post-workout nutrition becomes vital to your success. Although this is a very individualized thing, there are some constants; the first being that you need more than just protein after each session. Protein combined with carbohydrates is essential immediately following a workout - it's just a matter of how much of each based on the individual. The ideal ratio of carbs:protein can typically run anywhere from 2:1 to 4:1 depending on the athlete's body composition and type of training session just completed. The source of carbohydrates should be something that will work quickly with minimal interference. Some examples would be maltodextrin or sugar. The priority is timing and you want to make sure this liquid shake is taken immediately after the session is completed in order to replenish your glycogen stores decreased from training and spark muscle protein synthesis. Approximately one hour after drinking this shake, you should then consume a whole foods meal consisting of lean protein and carbohydrates. A great example of that would be some grilled chicken and a sweet potato. Again, the amounts of protein and carbs are extremely individualized. It doesn’t have to be the size of a traditional dinner, and each athlete must find their ideal ratio, but the constant is timing and the combining of the two macronutrients.

  1. Skimping on Sleep and Skipping Rest Days

Nearly as important as what you’re doing in the gym is what you’re doing outside of the gym. The ability to recover is instrumental to seeing consistent gains in athletic performance. Growth Hormone (GH) is an essential part of that recovery. It allows the body’s ability to repair itself after intense exercise through muscular hypertrophy and plays a significant role in the maintenance of lean body mass. Nearly 50% of GH secretion occurs during the third and fourth NREM sleep stages. If you are regularly skimping on sleep by 2 or more hours you are missing the body’s prime production time of GH, and thereby not recovering as you could or should be. Basically all the effort you put into your squat cycle was just thwarted by a significant percentage if you were sleep deprived during it. Another important aspect of recovery is taking needed rest days. Continuing to workout through a certain level of fatigue or soreness can actually be counterproductive long term.   

     10.  Asking for Advice and Then Not Implementing it.

See 1-9

Read more

Top 10 Mistakes CrossFitters Make

Posted by Talayna Fortunato on

 

Top 10 Mistakes CrossFitters Make by WODSuperStore.com

Top 10 Mistakes CrossFitters Make

  1. Not Warming Up Properly

Everyday it takes me around 30 minutes to warm-up. I start with easy cardio for 5-10 min. then do some light foam rolling and stretching, leg swings, lunges, rotator cuff exercises, and finally movements specific to the workout I’m about to do. My warm-up has gotten more extensive (and longer) with each year I do CrossFit®. Almost to the point that it started to annoy me, and then I remembered back to my gymnastics days. Ever since I was on team at age 8, I remember our warm-ups taking us at least 30 minutes with all of the stretching and other calisthenics we did. Even though we were young and healthy I believe the gymnastics coaches knew what they were doing to keep us that way. With the intensity of competitive CrossFit® it’s imperative to put in the time for an adequate warm-up and mobility work. If you don’t put in the time now you’ll put it in later when you have an injury.

  1. Eating too Strict of a Paleo Diet

If you are a recreational CrossFitter following a Paleo lifestyle is probably nutritionally adequate and a good way of maintaining longevity and health. However, if you are a competitive level athlete and training intensely more than an hour a day your main source of energy is carbohydrates and strict paleo simply does not provide enough sources of them. Now I’m not saying to go out and carb load on pasta, bread, or sugar. That’s just an inflammatory insulin bomb. I am saying look for complex sources of carbohydrates from plants and low glycemic grains to add into your diet, especially when training is at its peak. During an interview at the Games every individual athlete was asked who follows a paleo diet, and not a single one raised their hand.

  1. Sacrificing Technique and Movement Efficiency for Intensity and Eventual Technical Breakdown.

CrossFit gets results due to the intensity of the workouts, but that doesn't mean throw all good form out the window. For example if your back starts rounding when you’re pulling from the ground or you’re chasing wildly after snatches, it’s time to put the bar down until you can regain efficiency. Your back and other body parts will thank you later! Also if you’re compromising range of motion enough to miss consecutive reps, take a quick rest before you go again. Otherwise you’re ingraining poor habits and when you reach that place of pain and fatigue again in competition guess what’ll happen… No Rep!

  1. Doing Volume for Volume’s Sake without Intent.

CrossFitters are notorious for thinking that when they’re getting ready to compete more is better. This mindset leads to the performance of multiple hero WoDs in a day with the intent of “loading”, when what it really does is break the athlete down with laborious repetition and impede lasting gains. More is not better, better is better. Having a purpose, i.e. knowing the energy system and muscular groups you’re trying to tax during a workout allows you to work smart and hard, not just hard. Again, your body will also thank you later!

  1. Cherry Picking Workouts and/or Jumping Around Programs

This is for the CrossFitter that walks into the gym and decides when they get there what workout they’re going to do based on what their gym posts and which one of the blogs they follow appears best that day. Blogs are written for a reason, with progressive intent to allow your workouts to build upon themselves for measurable improvements in your numbers. If you jump from program to program, weekly or even daily, that progress is completely short-circuited. Not to mention you’re probably doing mostly what you’re good at and not working your weaknesses enough.

  1. Following a Strength Progression that Doesn't Makes Sense or One Without Any Progression at All.

The body adapts to load by responding to meet the load in the form of muscular hypertrophy. There have been many studies showing the best percentages of max load, sets, reps, and frequency to produce optimal gains without under or overloading the athlete. These studies have produced named strength progression tables, squat cycles, and the like. You can reinvent the wheel and use yourself as a guinea pig to do your own research, or you can find a viable progression and just follow it. I’ll give you one guess what most long-term successful athletes do. One other thought to keep in mind is how much loading your conditioning work is providing.  An example would be making your conditioning heavy on the weights during the heaviest week of a strength loading cycle (no bueno).

  1. Forgetting to Supplement Your Program with Basics, Strict Strength, and Supplemental Work.

Just because you can kip almost any movement in CrossFit, doesn’t mean it’s in your best interest to do so all of the time. Working strict strength with things like dumbbell press or tempo bench press can do wonders for the strength of your jerk or stamina of kipping handstand push-ups. Sometimes to get better at a complex movement you need better strength with the basics as well. Think along the lines how important the hollow position is during kipping in general and you’ll see why doing hollow rocks would have carry over into almost all gymnastics movements. Basic skills and strict strength also overlap with supplemental work, which can be a great way to address muscular imbalances and push past plateaus. Supplemental work is also a staple in the work of some of the strongest people on the planet who employ Loui Simmon’s conjugate method.

  1. Waiting >90min. to Replenish After a Hard Training Session or Only Replenishing Protein.

The fact is the majority of CrossFitters do not need a liquid protein shake post-workout. If you are just doing CrossFit as part of a healthy lifestyle or you are trying to decrease body fat, then a meal consisting of lean protein, nutrient-dense carbs (vegetables) and healthy fat is best post-workout. However, if you are participating in CrossFit as a competitive athlete and are completing multiple grueling and taxing workouts several days per week (and many times twice per day), your post-workout nutrition becomes vital to your success. Although this is a very individualized thing, there are some constants; the first being that you need more than just protein after each session. Protein combined with carbohydrates is essential immediately following a workout - it's just a matter of how much of each based on the individual. The ideal ratio of carbs:protein can typically run anywhere from 2:1 to 4:1 depending on the athlete's body composition and type of training session just completed. The source of carbohydrates should be something that will work quickly with minimal interference. Some examples would be maltodextrin or sugar. The priority is timing and you want to make sure this liquid shake is taken immediately after the session is completed in order to replenish your glycogen stores decreased from training and spark muscle protein synthesis. Approximately one hour after drinking this shake, you should then consume a whole foods meal consisting of lean protein and carbohydrates. A great example of that would be some grilled chicken and a sweet potato. Again, the amounts of protein and carbs are extremely individualized. It doesn’t have to be the size of a traditional dinner, and each athlete must find their ideal ratio, but the constant is timing and the combining of the two macronutrients.

  1. Skimping on Sleep and Skipping Rest Days

Nearly as important as what you’re doing in the gym is what you’re doing outside of the gym. The ability to recover is instrumental to seeing consistent gains in athletic performance. Growth Hormone (GH) is an essential part of that recovery. It allows the body’s ability to repair itself after intense exercise through muscular hypertrophy and plays a significant role in the maintenance of lean body mass. Nearly 50% of GH secretion occurs during the third and fourth NREM sleep stages. If you are regularly skimping on sleep by 2 or more hours you are missing the body’s prime production time of GH, and thereby not recovering as you could or should be. Basically all the effort you put into your squat cycle was just thwarted by a significant percentage if you were sleep deprived during it. Another important aspect of recovery is taking needed rest days. Continuing to workout through a certain level of fatigue or soreness can actually be counterproductive long term.   

     10.  Asking for Advice and Then Not Implementing it.

See 1-9

Read more


Talayna Fortunato - Recap of the 2013 Games

Posted by Talayna Fortunato on


Trying to write a recap of the Games is like trying to summarize Moby Dick as a book about a big fish. So much can happen in a week. The biggest thing resonating with me this year after the experience is a relearned lesson that it's not over til it's over. You must keep fighting. If I had done that consistently the entire time this year like I did last year I think my middle events would've been better, and I didn't know it at the time but even one place better would've made the 7 point difference towards being on the podium again, and I was 10 points from 2nd. Every second counts. Instead, I let my attitude waiver and lost my fire until the final day.

Training this year for the Games I had more tweaks and little injuries that drug me down mentally and added to the burn out factor of the already exhausting training schedule from the Open to the Games. It's true what they say that the desire to win must come from within, and knowing I lost that leading up to the competition disappoints me greatly. I saw it in others, but it just wasn't in me like I know I'm capable of. I could go into all the reasons why that happened, but it doesn't matter. The final day helped to renew for me the reason why I started in the first place. That is the conviction that I have the ability to be one of, if not the best at this. I feel I have more ability to recognize that and I owe it to myself and my maker to honor that. Sorry if that sounds sappy or emotional, but when people ask me why I compete in CrossFit that is at the heart of it. I saw it on Stacie Tovar's wrist wraps and I agree... "Because you have the ability to".

Now that that's off my chest I'll take the mood a little lighter and talk about the highlights of what I learned over the weekend. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly!

- The women who competed came from all different places and backgrounds, but share in their amazing heart, grit, and genuine spirit. I definitely felt more of a community and support between all of us this year and that was uplifting.

  

- Our greatest fans there are the volunteers. They cheered us thru the tunnel in and out of every event. It was very moving to me and I'd like to thank them.

- My biggest fan is still my Mom. She wore a "Talayna's Mom" shirt proudly all weekend and simply has the time of her life at the competitions. She has Muscular Dystrophy and could never do athletics so she gets real joy out of my abilities. Knowing I can give her the gift of watching me is another motivating factor to compete again.

 

- "Rowing a 22K today sounds like an awesome idea" - No one ever. I will say this, half way thru I bit the bullet and went from 15th place all the way to 7th. Completing that with a faster split on the second half is something I was not aware I was even capable of. I also wasn't aware my hamstring insertions were capable of so much pain I could barely stand! The mind definitely gives up before the body on a challenge like this. Control the first one and the second is yours!

- Swim WODs are fun & I desperately need swim lessons! I've never had proper swim lessons and I quit swimming this year because it was hurting my shoulder. I can do 1,000's of butterfly pull-ups and it be fine yet a 1/4 mile swim hurts me, so I'm obviously doing something wrong?!

- All the hype about shooting guns, triple-unders, and back flips being in an event was just that... hype! Maybe next year they'll combine all 3 and call it the gullible circus clown triplet.

- I look like a maimed penguin when I have to repetitive squat and then run. Combine that with the plethora of hill running I did in FL (insert sarcastic undertone) and Naught Nancy was definitely my Achilles heel in terms of ability last weekend. More burning lactic threshold work to come, fun!

- It could have been worse.  I could have been wearing a full red body suit, like my sponsor's mascot at their booth.

- When you go junk yard dog hard on a WoD like Cinco 1 that's just beyond your weight capabilities a few things can happen. 1. You get hella sore! 2. You realize the weight really wasn't beyond your capability at all. Finishing this WoD was the highlight of my entire Games. Deadlifts have been a nemesis to me for quite a while. I have only pulled 300# or more twice and this called for 15 at 265. I definitely started down the fear loop (thank you Tony Blauer) during the warm up, but I was aware I was going there. Doug wanted to smack me out of it. He said approach the bar and do whatever I have to do to get myself growling at it like a rabid dog and lift the damn thing. I don't think I have ever made a face like that lifting before. I'm embarrassed to see it on TV, but I also can't wait. 

Coming in second to the amazing Elisabeth Akinwale (who can deadlift over 100lbs more than me) on a deadlift WoD at the Games is something I wouldn't have believed I could do. Junk yard dog is a powerful thing, and another lesson learned.

- I had a surgery on my left ankle at 15. I tweaked it before Regionals which kept me from sprinting for training and again tweaked it warming up for the zig zag sprint. Now I have a bone spur, boney fragment, and lateral instability in it. All fixable, but it's time to do it now. I told someone in an interview this year that I'd be done competing in CrossFit after my first surgery and I'd like to apologize... for lying.

- Barney could still care less how I did at the Games.

- There's nothing like hitting the wall on legless rope climbs, again and again and again, staring at your arms in disbelief that they won't do what you tell them to do when you're not even breathing hard, and watching a workout unravel in front of you to make you so angry and frustrated that you can't see straight. Just ask Rich Fronning. The question is, what do you do with that frustrated energy. My friend in the Master's Christi Warren, had the same thing happen on her final event, taking her from 6th to 9th. When I asked her if she'd compete again, she said she has to now. She needs the redemption for herself. I'm right there with you girl!

- Lastly thank you to my sponsor's WoD SuperStore.com and Rx Jump Ropes, the Athlete Cell and my dedicated and talented guru coach Doug Katona, 3Fu3l for keeping my recovery strong and nutrition replenished, all the coaches and my friends at RealFitness and Redline in Naples, FL for supporting me and putting up with my crazy workouts, especially Jeff, Lauren, Jonas, and Liz for actually doing the weekend ones with me, and thank you to the one above for my ability and the opportunity to compete.

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Talayna Fortunato - Recap of the 2013 Games

Posted by Talayna Fortunato on


Trying to write a recap of the Games is like trying to summarize Moby Dick as a book about a big fish. So much can happen in a week. The biggest thing resonating with me this year after the experience is a relearned lesson that it's not over til it's over. You must keep fighting. If I had done that consistently the entire time this year like I did last year I think my middle events would've been better, and I didn't know it at the time but even one place better would've made the 7 point difference towards being on the podium again, and I was 10 points from 2nd. Every second counts. Instead, I let my attitude waiver and lost my fire until the final day.

Training this year for the Games I had more tweaks and little injuries that drug me down mentally and added to the burn out factor of the already exhausting training schedule from the Open to the Games. It's true what they say that the desire to win must come from within, and knowing I lost that leading up to the competition disappoints me greatly. I saw it in others, but it just wasn't in me like I know I'm capable of. I could go into all the reasons why that happened, but it doesn't matter. The final day helped to renew for me the reason why I started in the first place. That is the conviction that I have the ability to be one of, if not the best at this. I feel I have more ability to recognize that and I owe it to myself and my maker to honor that. Sorry if that sounds sappy or emotional, but when people ask me why I compete in CrossFit that is at the heart of it. I saw it on Stacie Tovar's wrist wraps and I agree... "Because you have the ability to".

Now that that's off my chest I'll take the mood a little lighter and talk about the highlights of what I learned over the weekend. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly!

- The women who competed came from all different places and backgrounds, but share in their amazing heart, grit, and genuine spirit. I definitely felt more of a community and support between all of us this year and that was uplifting.

  

- Our greatest fans there are the volunteers. They cheered us thru the tunnel in and out of every event. It was very moving to me and I'd like to thank them.

- My biggest fan is still my Mom. She wore a "Talayna's Mom" shirt proudly all weekend and simply has the time of her life at the competitions. She has Muscular Dystrophy and could never do athletics so she gets real joy out of my abilities. Knowing I can give her the gift of watching me is another motivating factor to compete again.

 

- "Rowing a 22K today sounds like an awesome idea" - No one ever. I will say this, half way thru I bit the bullet and went from 15th place all the way to 7th. Completing that with a faster split on the second half is something I was not aware I was even capable of. I also wasn't aware my hamstring insertions were capable of so much pain I could barely stand! The mind definitely gives up before the body on a challenge like this. Control the first one and the second is yours!

- Swim WODs are fun & I desperately need swim lessons! I've never had proper swim lessons and I quit swimming this year because it was hurting my shoulder. I can do 1,000's of butterfly pull-ups and it be fine yet a 1/4 mile swim hurts me, so I'm obviously doing something wrong?!

- All the hype about shooting guns, triple-unders, and back flips being in an event was just that... hype! Maybe next year they'll combine all 3 and call it the gullible circus clown triplet.

- I look like a maimed penguin when I have to repetitive squat and then run. Combine that with the plethora of hill running I did in FL (insert sarcastic undertone) and Naught Nancy was definitely my Achilles heel in terms of ability last weekend. More burning lactic threshold work to come, fun!

- It could have been worse.  I could have been wearing a full red body suit, like my sponsor's mascot at their booth.

- When you go junk yard dog hard on a WoD like Cinco 1 that's just beyond your weight capabilities a few things can happen. 1. You get hella sore! 2. You realize the weight really wasn't beyond your capability at all. Finishing this WoD was the highlight of my entire Games. Deadlifts have been a nemesis to me for quite a while. I have only pulled 300# or more twice and this called for 15 at 265. I definitely started down the fear loop (thank you Tony Blauer) during the warm up, but I was aware I was going there. Doug wanted to smack me out of it. He said approach the bar and do whatever I have to do to get myself growling at it like a rabid dog and lift the damn thing. I don't think I have ever made a face like that lifting before. I'm embarrassed to see it on TV, but I also can't wait. 

Coming in second to the amazing Elisabeth Akinwale (who can deadlift over 100lbs more than me) on a deadlift WoD at the Games is something I wouldn't have believed I could do. Junk yard dog is a powerful thing, and another lesson learned.

- I had a surgery on my left ankle at 15. I tweaked it before Regionals which kept me from sprinting for training and again tweaked it warming up for the zig zag sprint. Now I have a bone spur, boney fragment, and lateral instability in it. All fixable, but it's time to do it now. I told someone in an interview this year that I'd be done competing in CrossFit after my first surgery and I'd like to apologize... for lying.

- Barney could still care less how I did at the Games.

- There's nothing like hitting the wall on legless rope climbs, again and again and again, staring at your arms in disbelief that they won't do what you tell them to do when you're not even breathing hard, and watching a workout unravel in front of you to make you so angry and frustrated that you can't see straight. Just ask Rich Fronning. The question is, what do you do with that frustrated energy. My friend in the Master's Christi Warren, had the same thing happen on her final event, taking her from 6th to 9th. When I asked her if she'd compete again, she said she has to now. She needs the redemption for herself. I'm right there with you girl!

- Lastly thank you to my sponsor's WoD SuperStore.com and Rx Jump Ropes, the Athlete Cell and my dedicated and talented guru coach Doug Katona, 3Fu3l for keeping my recovery strong and nutrition replenished, all the coaches and my friends at RealFitness and Redline in Naples, FL for supporting me and putting up with my crazy workouts, especially Jeff, Lauren, Jonas, and Liz for actually doing the weekend ones with me, and thank you to the one above for my ability and the opportunity to compete.

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